News Portal

Failed to load

September 12, 2017

Conversion of organic waste into valuable products is becoming more widespread, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The treatment of waste by larvae of the black soldier fly (BSF) has especially raised much attention in recent years.  Despite these advances, a significant need existed for guidelines on how to set up and operate a commercially viable treatment facility. The Black Soldier Fly Biowaste Processing: A Step-by-Step Guide published in July 2017 summarises the results of ten years of research and development in this field at Eawag and imparts valuable know-how through practical advice and instructions. Read more

Collection of samples from a groundwater pump in the Gujrat district of Punjab province (Photo: Tasawar Khanam, COMSATS)
August 23, 2017

Arsenic-contaminated groundwater used as drinking water or for irrigation may threaten the health of 50 to 60 million people in Pakistan. This is shown by an Eawag-led study – co-financed by SDC – in which data from 1200 groundwater samples was analysed and combined with geological and hydrological parameters to generate a hazard map. Read more

Eawag scientists handle the wastewater disposal line mess at NEST: At the Water Hub, they develop technologies for the treatment of separated wastewater streams. (Foto: Roman Keller)
July 24, 2017

It has been a year since the research building NEST was inaugurated by Empa and Eawag. Since then, scientists working in the research platform Water Hub have investigated new models and methods to recycle waste water. Experiments for processing and reusing grey water started in June.  Read more

Carpanak close to Van was until the years of 1960 a peninsula, accessible by foot. Photo: Yama Tomonaga
May 16, 2017

The sediments of Lake Van in Eastern Anatolia (Turkey) are a valuable climate archive. Now, using the salinity measured in sediment porewater, scientists have reconstructed the huge lake-level fluctuations that occurred over the past 250,000 years. This approach – based on simple physical concepts – is likely to be more widely applied in the future. Read more