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Almost 100 million plastic spheres reduce evaporation losses from the Los Angeles Ivanhoe reservoir. (Photo: Junkyardsparkle, CC0 1.0)
July 17, 2018

Black plastic balls, which aim to reduce evaporation losses from open-air reservoirs under drought conditions, are not quite as efficient as previously assumed. Considerable quantities of water are already used in their production.  Read more

On the Blinnenbach stream near Reckingen (canton of Valais), connectivity is disrupted by the weir of the Wannebode hydropower plant. (Photo: Eawag)
July 5, 2018

Small hydropower plants are often constructed on alpine streams, where they may have adverse impacts on sensitive ecosystems. Little is known, however, about the particular effects of individual plants, or the cumulative effects of multiple plants within the same river system. The current state of knowledge has now been reviewed in a study by Eawag researchers.  Read more

June 15, 2018

The CENTAUR sewer control system has been recognized as the ‘Most Innovative New Technology of the Year’ at the 2018 Water Industry Awards in England. CENTAUR stands for ‘Cost Effective Neural Technique for Alleviation of Urban Flood Risk’ and is funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme. Eawag researchers were part of this project. Read more

Membrane units of nitrogen recovery plant at WWTP Yverdon-les-Bains (Photo: Alpha Wassertechnik AG)
April 30, 2018

There is a wealth of energy and nutrients in wastewater. New processes enable the recovery of these resources from wastewater and sewage sludge, with the goal of redefining the function of the wastewater-treatment plants. Formerly energy users, they will become energy producers and the source of valuable fertilizer. This new technology has convinced the Swiss Climate Cent Foundation. It is contributing financial support to the construction of the new installation in the ARA Altenrhein. Read more

If global warming cannot be limited to 1.5 °C, approximately one third of the land area and one fifth of the population will be affected by drought.  Photo: BAFU, Judith Grundmann
February 22, 2018

The earth’s water supply is changing because of global warming: the ratio of precipitation to evaporation is sinking, and additional arid zones may emerge. The speed at which this development is likely to take place has been analysed by an international team including Eawag researchers.  Read more

Outlet of the Rhone into Lake Geneva near le Bouveret: tributaries have a cooling effect on the predicted temperature increase of lakes due to climate change. Photo: Rama, Wikimedia Commons, Cc-by-sa-2.0-fr
February 19, 2018

If the climate heats up, the temperature in the uppermost layer of lakes will increase, the thermic layering will become more stable and last longer, and less oxygen will reach the depths – this is the present theory on the effect of climate change on lakes. Read more

Caitlin Proctor and Frederik Hammes investigating biofilms in shower hoses. (Photo: Eawag, Aldo Todaro)
February 15, 2018

A shower hose will often contain more bacteria than the rest of the building’s plumbing system. A research team led by Frederik Hammes has been investigating this topic for the past four years. In their latest study, they analysed biofilms in 78 shower hoses from 11 countries, and in 21 of them, they detected legionella – a potential pathogen. In this interview, Hammes explains why we should not be unduly concerned. Read more

Experimental flooding: Eawag researchers collecting data to improve the modelling of flash floods in urban areas. (Photo: Andreas Scheidegger, Eawag)
February 12, 2018

Heavy rainfall can cause flash floods in urban areas. While data from flood events is required to model such phenomena, water levels and discharges are not routinely measured above ground. Eawag now plans to make use of widely available images and videos to estimate these values. Read more

The cordless transmission of data from underground is a challenge. A researcher making distance measurement tests in the wireless sensor network. (Photo: S. Dicht / C. Ebi, Eawag)
February 8, 2018

When a person wearing a bright-orange protective suit and carrying a laptop climbs out of a sewer shaft, it could well be an employee of the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag). Especially if this happens in Fehraltorf. Since 2016, Eawag has been constructing an internationally unique net of sensors that document water circulation in residential areas. Read more